Town Clerk’s Office, Church Street – 1920s

Edward, Prince of Wales, standing in his vehicle (far left) as it slowly passes along Church Street during his visit in the late 1920s.

The building in the centre is the Town Clerk’s Office which provided the only access to the Guildhall building whaich was, in these days, the Town Hall. If you look up to the rear of today’s Guildhall, you’ll see the doors that provided that access still in situ high on the building which is today accessed from below via spiral staircases.

Image courtesy of Marcus Thompson from the Harold Burleigh Thompson collection

Church Street – 1920s

Looking out along Church Street from Market Square, showing the decorations in place for the visit of Edward, Prince of Wales in the late 1920s.

Image courtesy of Marcus Thompson from the Harold Burleigh Thompson collection

Church Street – 1920s

Looking out along Church Street from Market Square, showing the decorations in place for the visit of Edward, Prince of Wales in the late 1920s. Note the portable refreshments cabin on the far right which was used by horse-drawn taxi drivers in quiet moments !

Image courtesy of Marcus Thompson from the Harold Burleigh Thompson collection

St Johns Church c.1904

An interesting shot of St Johns Church if only for the two objects in the foreground.

On the left is the mobile tea room for the use of the horse drawn taxi operators and on the right is the old hand water pump that dated well back into the 1800s and was used by market traders and, in particular, the fish traders that used to operate on this site. 

St John’s Church c.1904

Note in the old image the mobile tea-room used by horse drawn taxi-cab drivers on the far left and the hand-operated water pump far right that was used by fish traders on market days.

You may note that the church sits in its own little depression in the land and that, allegedly, was because the topsoil was so contaminated with blood from slaughtered and butchered animals that it had to be dug out in order to provide “pure ground” for the building of the church.

Corn Exchange, Church Street

c.1960 -v- 2008

The Peterborough Corn Exchange on the left, which became the site of the Central Post Office which, in turn, was demolished in 2009 to form part of the new “open-space” area in the centre of the city.

The Corn Exchange was built in 1846 and opened on 24th November 1848 on the site of an old theatre and went on to become reputedly the busiest Exchange in the region right up to WW2 when it was badly damaged by a German incendiary bomb.

cornexchange-then

cornexchange-now