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Black Horse Inn, Westgate (c.1900)

In 2017, the photographer would be standing at the John Lewis end of the Wortley Almshouses and looking across to the corner of Westgate and Lincoln Road. This image shows the view around 1900 with the Black Horse Inn far left and the iron fencing far right that protected Peterborough’s first underground toilets in the middle of Westgate !

Bull Hotel, Westgate

The Bull Hotel on Westgate pictured in the early 1980s just after having new windows added !

Westgate Mansion House – Wilfrid Wood

Looking down Westgate, with the old Mansion House on the right, viewed from the junction with Long Causeway/Broadway as depicted in a wonderful 1940s watercolour painting by urban landscape artist Wilfrid Rene Wood (1888-1976).

Wortley Almshouses – Wilfrid Wood

The Wortley Almshouses on Westgate opposite the junction with Lincoln Road, captured in a 1942 painting by urban landscape artist Wilfrid Rene Wood (1888-1976).

Walton Tram on Westgate

A Walton bound tram moving along Westgate and approaching the turn onto the Boroughbury end of Lincoln Road.

Edwardian Westgate in Colour

A nice hand coloured Edwardian view along Westgate.

 

Long Causeway (1980)

Looking down on Long Causeway from the corner of Midgate in 1980 with the new Queensgate centre taking shape.

Bull Hotel – Back Yard

The back yard / car park of the Bull Hotel on Westgate pictured around 1972.

The local lads with the car include well known local musician Lloyd Watson with the afro-cut at the very rear. The others are Robin Wilcock (left in vest), Steve “Gunner” Gunns (front on bonnet), Richard Prudames (standing right) and Pete Stanley (on roof in blue).

Johnson’s Corner

The corner of Westgate and Lincoln Road in the 1960s showing newsagent/tobaconist/bookseller/stationer “Johnson’s Corner”.

Despite becoming a Grade II listed building in 1973, the only remains of the building today are parts of the foundations on and around a car park !

Edwardian Family Portrait

A nice family portrait from around 1910 and captured by photographer May Bone working at her Westgate studio. May listed herself as a “photographer’s apprentice” as a 14 year old at her home base at Fakenham, Norfolk and by age 30 had studios in Fakenham, Aylsham, Hunstanton and Peterborough.

After her death, her Peterborough studio was purchased by John Rozelar and then, in 1957, by Thomas Howell and became part of the locally well known Campkins business.